Waiting Well

Waiting Well

Our small group is doing a Kyle Idleman video study called “The End of Me.” Thursday night we watched a testimony of a woman who knew God had called her to minister in a certain area, but after she got “the call,” she waited on God in prayer for a year and a half before acting. Her story sparked some interesting discussion. Why didn’t she immediately step out on faith and begin the work? Was she afraid? Or was God using the time to prepare her . . . or someone else?

Most of us, whether boldly or in our own quiet ways, are doers and fixers. We see a problem and we want to make it right. Have you ever been in a situation where you couldn’t “fix it,” or you knew God was telling you to sit back and watch Him work? I have. And I’m not real fond of circling in a holding pattern. I don’t wait well.

Years ago I read “Fresh Wind, Fresh Fire”–Jim Cymbala’s, story of being called to pastor a struggling inner city church. What would you do if God had put this call on your life? I think a lot of us would start at the logical place: form a committee. Actually, multiple committees–one to study the demographics of the area, another to work on publicity, maybe a few more to upgrade the sound and lighting systems, design a new sign, create an online presence, and update the decor. All with the noble goal of making the church more visible and inviting.

What did Pastor Cymbala and a small group of hopeful believers do in Brooklyn forty-some years ago? They canceled everything . . . but prayer. No programs, ad campaigns, outreach events. Just prayer. And one by one, the hurting and broken were drawn to the Brooklyn Tabernacle and the message of new life in Christ.

Of course, there are those times when God puts something on our hearts and we know it comes with an expiration date. Call her now. Talk to him now. But how often do we get impatient and want to jump in and “start something,” when what we really need to do is simply wait . . . in prayer, and watch how God works things out in a way we could never have dreamed would happen.

Lord, show us how to wait well–at your feet, in hopeful expectation.

 

 

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Becky Melby About Becky Melby

Wisconsin resident Becky Melby is the author of the Lost Sanctuary Series and a dozen other contemporary fiction titles. Married for 43 years, mother of four, grandmother to fifteen, Becky thrives on writing, reading, camping, rides on the back of a silver Gold Wing, and time with family. Connect with her at her website or Facebook.

Comments

  1. So true, Becky, and this thought has been something I’ve been pondering a lot since focusing on my word of the year (“trust”)… I LOVED the examples you gave here. Wish I was in that bible study with you… I’ll bet it’s a good one!

    [Reply]

    Becky Melby

    Becky Melby Reply:

    Wish you could be in that study too, Cherie. We can’t wait well without trust–have to wonder how people cope without it, don’t you?

    [Reply]

    Cherie Burbach

    Cherie Burbach Reply:

    Definitely.

    [Reply]

  2. Becky, waiting well are two words that normally do not go together or at least in a comfortable sense. You’ve helped me become more atuned to the power of prayer in waiting times.

    [Reply]

    Becky Melby

    Becky Melby Reply:

    I need constant reminders to fill the waiting with prayer. Blessings on your waiting, Jude.

    [Reply]

  3. Waiting is so hard! Thanks for your reminder of the power to wait on the Lord’s timing. If we could only get it through our heads how vital prayer was to prepare us…

    [Reply]

    Cherie Burbach

    Cherie Burbach Reply:

    Good point, Lisa! Prayer can really help us during those times when waiting seems pointless or unbearable.

    [Reply]

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